ketogenic foods for ketosis

the top 100 most ketogenic diet foods


Ketosis occurs when our insulin levels drop and our body switches to fat for fuel.

Managing our insulin response to the food we eat is critical to ensuring that we are able to burn fat.

The food insulin index data indicates that our insulin response to food is best predicted, not just by carbohydrate, but also the protein and fibre content of our food.

This improved understanding can help us prioritise foods with a lower insulin load that will help us improve our blood glucose control.

But before we get to the list of the most ketogenic foods, let’s look at the research and the theory that enables us to identify foods that will cause the least insulin response.

food insulin index

The initial research into the food insulin index was detailed in a 1997 paper An insulin index of foods: the insulin demand generated by 1000-kJ portions of common foods by Susanne Holt, Jennie Brand Miller and Peter Petocz who tested the insulin response to thirty-eight different foods.

insulinindex

The food insulin index score of various foods was determined by feeding 1000kJ (or 239 kcal) of different foods to non-diabetic participants and measuring their insulin response over three hours.   This was then compared to the insulin response of pure glucose (which is assigned a value of 100%) to arrive at a “food insulin index” value for each food.

FII versus time chart.jpg

Considering how significant this information could be for people trying to manage their insulin levels (e.g. people with diabetes, “low carbers” or “ketonians”) I was surprised that there hadn’t been much further research or discussion on the topic.  I found a few references and mentions in podcasts, but no one was quite sure what to do with the information, mainly due to the fact that only a small number of foods been tested.

more food insulin index data

Digging a bit further I came across a recent PhD thesis from the University Of Sydney titled Clinical Application of the Food Insulin Index to Diabetes Mellitus (Kirstine Bell, September 2014) which contained a more extensive list of foods that had been tested since the original study.

With this additional data perhaps we can make more sense of the various factors that affect insulin, the master regulating hormone of our metabolism?

In the chart below I have plotted the carbohydrates versus the insulin response of foods for more than one hundred foods.  Although insulin is loosely correlated with the carbohydrate content of our food, we can see that high protein foods such as steak, tuna and fish still require a significant amount of insulin.

2017-03-10.png

I ran some analysis on the data and found that we secrete about half as much insulin in response to protein compared to carbohydrate.  And we get the best correlation when we assume that indigestible fibre does not raise insulin.  Interestingly, fructose only requires about a quarter of the insulin as carbohydrate.

Once we account for protein and fibre we get a much better prediction of the insulin response to food compared carbohydrate alone.  People wanting to follow a low carb or ketogenic diet will want to eat foods that lie towards the bottom left of this chart.

image0152

[Check out this cool interactive visualisation of all the FII test data here.]

Using this understanding we can calculate insulin load of our food using the following formula:

insulin load = total carbohydrate – fibre + 0.56 x protein – 0.725 x fructose

We can also calculate the proportion of the energy in our food that requires insulin to metabolise (i.e. “the percentage of insulinogenic calories”).

image016

If you have the macronutrient details of food or a meal you can calculate the percentage  of insulinogenic calories using this calculator created by Dr Ted Naiman.

possible applications

Insulin is not bad at normal levels, but we are understanding more and more that excess insulin (e.g. hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, Type 2 diabetes) is highly problematic, perhaps as much or more than high blood glucose levels.

Understanding how to calculate our insulin response to food could enable us to better manage our diet to avoid elevated blood glucose and hyperinsulinemia.

The biggest challenge for someone with Type 1 Diabetes (like my wife) occurs when you require a large dose of insulin to address a high blood glucose level that is caused by eating non-fibre carbohydrates and large amounts of protein.  It’s much easier to manage your blood glucose levels when the insulin load of your diet is lower (i.e. less non-fibre carbohydrates and moderate protein).

A more accurate understanding of insulin load can also help people with diabetes more accurately calculate their insulin dose or people trying to manage conditions like cancer or epilepsy through a therapeutic ketogenic diet.

For the rest of us who are somewhere on the insulin resistance scale, being able to calculate the insulin load of our diet will enable us to enable our pancreas to keep with our diet and maintain normal blood glucose levels.

the most ketogenic foods

Listed below are the most ketogenic foods.  I have included a number of other parameters that may be of interest:

  • energy density – foods that contain high levels of fibre and water have a low energy density (i.e. calories per 100g) and will tend to make us full with fewer calories.
  • percentage of insulinogenic calories – this is the proportion of the energy in the food that will require insulin to metabolise.
  • insulin load – foods such as non-starchy vegetables have a higher proportion of insulinogenic calories, but because of their low energy density will have a very low insulin load per 100g of food, meaning that you will need to eat a lot of that particular food for it to affect your blood glucose or insulin significantly.
  • net carbohydrates – these are the digestible carbohydrates that will affect your blood glucose levels and insulin that remain after you account for the indigestible fibre.

The amount you need to prioritise each of these parameters depends on a range of considerations including your blood glucose control and your weight loss goals.   Along with the insulin response to different foods, nutrient density and energy density are other important parameters we can use to optimise our food choices.

2016-07-06 (11)

The chart below shows the nutrients provided by the most ketogenic foods in comparison to the USDA foods database.  We can see that there are quite a number of nutrients that are less available in the most ketogenic foods compared to the average of the foods that commonly available.   While it is valuable to manage the insulin load of our diet it is also important to maximise the nutrient density of our diet as much as we can while still maintaining excellent blood glucose levels.

2017-02-27 (10).png

different foods for different goals

The table below contains links to separate blog posts and printable .pdfs detailing optimal foods for a range of dietary approaches (sorted from most to least nutrient dense) that may be of interest depending on your situation and goals.   You can print them out to stick to your fridge or add to your list for your next shopping expedition.

dietary approach printable .pdf
weight loss (insulin sensitive) download
autoimmune (nutrient dense) download
alkaline foods download
nutrient dense bulking download
nutrient dense (maintenance) download
weight loss (insulin resistant) download
autoimmune (diabetes friendly) download
zero carb download
diabetes and nutritional ketosis download
vegan (nutrient dense) download
vegan (diabetic friendly) download
therapeutic ketosis download
avoid download

If you’re not sure which approach is right for you and whether you are insulin resistant, this survey may help identify the optimal dietary approach for you.

image02

I have sorted the foods below by insulin load which will be useful if you are looking for foods to help you manage the insulin load of your diet.  If you’re interested, the most ketogenic foods article has these foods sorted by their proportion of insulinogenic calories.

Focusing on foods with a low percentage of insulinogenic calories will be useful if you are aiming for a high fat therapeutic ketogenic diet.  Focusing on foods with a low insulin load may be more useful if you want to lose weight and use some of your body fat for fuel.

the most ketogenic diet foods

eggs

Eggs are a staple for low carbers, ketogenic dieters and diabetics.  Not only are they nutritious they are also low in carbohydrates.

 Fried-Egg-Wallpaper-5

food % insulinogenic insulin load (g/100g) calories/100g
egg yolk 18% 12 275
whole egg 30% 10 143
egg white 74% 9 52

The egg white is higher in protein and hence more insulinogenic.  At the same time the energy density (calories/100g) of the egg white is lower and hence the insulin load per 100g for the egg white is lower.

dairy

Some people believe that red meat and dairy are uniquely insulinogenic, however, my reading of the food insulin index data is that there is nothing special about these foods that aren’t explained by their carbohydrate, protein and fibre content.

Dairy foods typically have a high energy density.  This is great if you’re a growing baby, an athlete trying to replenish energy or a bodybuilder trying to spike insulin for hypertrophy.  High palatability and high energy density are not a good combination if you’re trying to lose weight.

cheese

food % insulinogenic net carbs/100g insulin load  (g/100g) calories/100g
cream cheese 10% 4 8 348
cottage cheese 38% 3 9 93
ricotta cheese 25% 3 11 174
feta cheese 22% 4 14 265
Limburger cheese 18% 0 15 327
Camembert cheese 20% 0 15 299
brie cheese 19% 0 16 334
Muenster cheese 20% 1 18 368
blue cheese 20% 2 18 354
mozzarella 23% 2 18 318
Monterey 20% 1 19 373
cheddar cheese 20% 1 20 403
Colby 20% 3 20 394
Edam cheese 22% 1 20 356
Gouda cheese 23% 2 20 356
provolone 24% 2 21 350
Gruyère cheese 21% 0 22 412
goat cheese 22% 2 25 451
Swiss cheese 26% 5 25 379
parmesan cheese 30% 3 31 411

milk and cream

Milk has a higher proportion of insulin calories compared to cheese.  Butter and cream have a lower insulin load and proportion of insulinogenic calories.

36959895мляко

food % insulinogenic net carbs/100g insulin load  (g/100g) calories/100g
butter 0% 0 1 734
cream 5% 4 5 431
goat milk 40% 4 7 69
full cream milk 44% 5 7 65
low fat milk 58% 5 7 50
human milk 43% 7 8 71
reduced fat milk 59% 5 8 51

yoghurt

Full fat plain Greek yoghurt has the lowest percentage of insulinogenic calories while the sweetened and low fat options are extremely insulinogenic.

greek-yogurt

food % insulinogenic net carbs/100g insulin load  (g/100g) calories/100g
Greek Yoghurt 27% 6 9 130
plain low-fat yoghurt 69% 7 11 63
skim milk yoghurt 86% 8 12 55
Low-fat fruit yoghurt 93% 19 22 95

fruit

It’s interesting to note that there are only a handful of fruits with a low percentage of insulinogenic calories (i.e. olives and avocados).  However, some fruits like oranges have a lower insulin load because of their low energy density and therefore may not spike your blood sugar as much as dates or raisins which have a high proportion of insulinogenic calories as well as a high insulin load.  If in doubt, get a blood glucose metre and compare how much your favourite foods raise your blood glucose levels.

spanish-olives

food % insulinogenic insulin load (g/100g) calories/100g
olives 3% 1 145
avocado 8% 3 160
blackberries 27% 3 43
raspberries 30% 4 52
strawberries 49% 4 32
apples 50% 7 52
gooseberries 52% 6 44
passionfruit 52% 14 97
apples 54% 7 48
pears 54% 7 50
boysenberries 54% 8 50
kiwifruit 55% 9 61
carambola 56% 5 31
blueberries 56% 9 57
blueberries 58% 14 88
watermelon 60% 5 30
jackfruit 61% 16 95
cherries 61% 9 50
mango 63% 11 60
pears 64% 7 42
cranberries 65% 8 46

vegetables

There aren’t many dietary approaches that don’t advise you to eat more vegetables.  It’s also hard to overeat non-starchy veggies because they have a very low-calorie density and are high in fibre.  Again, due to the low energy density, the net carbohydrates are low in a lot of the non-starchy veggies and hence won’t significantly raise your blood glucose levels.

vegetable-03

food % insulinogenic insulin load (g/100g) calories/100g
alfalfa 19% 1 23
chicory greens 23% 2 23
endive 23% 1 17
escarole 24% 1 19
coriander 30% 2 23
beet greens 35% 2 22
banana pepper 36% 3 27
mustard greens 36% 3 27
collards 37% 4 33
jalapeno peppers 37% 3 27
sauerkraut 39% 2 19
pickles 39% 1 12
cucumber 39% 1 12
zucchini 40% 2 17
red peppers 40% 3 31
chayote 40% 3 24
edamame 41% 13 121
radishes 43% 2 16
turnip greens 44% 4 29
summer squash 45% 2 19
arugula 45% 3 25
carrots 47% 5 37
parsley 48% 5 36
chives 48% 4 30
spinach 49% 4 23
artichokes 49% 7 47
soybeans (sprouted) 49% 12 81
Brussel sprouts 50% 6 42
lettuce 50% 2 15
asparagus 50% 3 22
celery 50% 3 18
bamboo shoots 50% 2 11
okra 50% 3 22
cauliflower 50% 4 25
broccoli 50% 5 35
turnips 51% 3 21
chard 51% 3 19
celery flakes 53% 42 319
dandelion greens 54% 7 45
Chinese cabbage 54% 2 12
red cabbage 55% 5 29
portabella mushrooms 55% 5 29
rhubarb 55% 3 21
cabbage 55% 4 23
shiitake mushroom 58% 7 39
snap beans 58% 3 15
yeast extract spread 59% 27 185
kale 60% 5 28
bamboo shoots 60% 5 27
turnips 61% 4 22
carrots 61% 4 23
potatoes 64% 26 158

nuts and seeds

Most nuts and seeds have a low percentage of insulinogenic calories though they have a higher energy density are possible to overeat.

food % insulinogenic insulin load (g/100g) calories/100g
macadamia nuts 6% 12 718
pecans 6% 12 691
coconut cream 8% 7 330
coconut milk 8% 5 230
brazil nuts 9% 16 659
coconut meat 10% 9 354
sesame seeds 10% 17 631
hazelnuts 10% 17 629
pine nuts 11% 21 673
flax seed 11% 16 534
walnuts 13% 22 619
sunflower seeds 15% 22 546
almonds 15% 25 607
almond butter 16% 26 614
butternuts 17% 28 612
pumpkin seeds 19% 29 559
sesame butter 21% 33 586
pistachio nuts 22% 34 569
cashews 26% 40 580
coconut 34% 39 443
gingko nuts 52% 15 111
coconut water 66% 3 19

seafood

Seafood is a great source of essential fatty acids which are heard to find in plant based foods.

seafood-salad-5616x3744-shrimp-scallop-greens-738

food % insulinogenic insulin load (g/100g) calories/100g
mackerel 14% 10 305
cisco 29% 13 177
caviar 33% 23 264
herring 36% 19 217
sardine 37% 19 208
anchovy 44% 22 210
trout 45% 18 168
fish roe 47% 18 143
sturgeon 49% 16 135
salmon 52% 20 156
tuna 52% 23 184
flounder 57% 12 86
oyster 59% 14 102
perch 62% 14 96
rockfish 66% 17 109
whiting 66% 18 116
halibut 66% 17 111
crayfish 67% 13 82
shrimp 69% 19 119
pollock 69% 18 111
white fish 70% 18 108
orange roughy 70% 17 105
haddock 71% 19 116
cod 71% 48 290
octopus 71% 28 164
lobster 71% 15 89
crab 71% 14 83
clam 73% 25 142
scallop 77% 22 111

animal products

7450703_orig

food % insulinogenic insulin load (g/100g) calories/100g
bacon 11% 11 417
bologna 11% 9 310
sweetbread 12% 9 318
liver sausage 13% 10 331
pepperoni 13% 16 504
blood sausage 14% 13 379
kielbasa 15% 12 325
knackwurst 16% 12 307
liver pate 16% 13 319
bratwurst 16% 13 333
frankfurter 17% 12 290
chorizo 17% 19 455
pork ribs 18% 16 361
beef sausage 18% 15 332
duck 18% 15 337
salami 18% 17 378
meatballs 19% 14 286
lamb rib 19% 17 361
turkey bacon 19% 11 226
pork sausage 20% 16 325
headcheese 20% 8 157
turkey 20% 21 414
beef brains 22% 8 151
pork sausage 25% 13 217
bologna 26% 11 172
T-bone steak 26% 19 294
lamb brains 27% 10 154

the Nutrient Optimiser

Building on the ability to quantify insulin load, nutrient density and energy density, more recently I have been developing a novel tool.  The Nutrient Optimiser reviews your food log diet and helps you to initially normalise your blood glucose and insulin levels by gradually retraining your eating habits by eliminating foods that boost your insulin level and blood glucose levels.

Once your glucose levels are normalised the Nutrient Optimiser focusses on your micro nutrient fingerprint to identify foods that will fill in your micro nutrient deficiencies with real food.

2017-03-08-2

If you still have weight to lose, the Nutrient Optimiser will focus on the energy density of your diet until you have achieved your desired level of weight loss.  Alternatively, the Nutrient Optimiser can help you if you were looking to increase your insulin levels for bulking or identify higher energy density foods for athletes.

It’s early days for the Nutrient Optimiser, but the initial results are very promising.

2017-03-082

 

Post last updated July 2017

166 thoughts on “the top 100 most ketogenic diet foods”

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s