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Tag Archives for " protein "

How much is too much protein? The A – Z Guide.

You eat too much protein, they say… Now that fat is out of the spotlight, the focus for many in low carb and vegan circles has turned to protein as the macronutrient that needs to be avoided for health, good blood sugar control and longevity. At the same time, there are still are plenty of […]

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Nutrient density at macronutrient extremes

In the previous article, Which Nutrients is YOUR Diet Missing?, we looked at nutrient density and the micronutrients that you might be lacking when following popular dietary strategies such as vegan, Paleo, keto, or zero carb. As a follow-up, I thought it would be interesting to look at the effect on essential micronutrients if we […]

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Optimising protein and insulin load

“Low carb”, “ketogenic” or “nutrient dense” mean different things to different people. Defining these terms numerically can help us to choose the right tool for the right application. Decreasing the insulin load of your diet can help normalise blood glucose levels and enable your pancreas to keep up. However, at the same time, a high […]

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The cost of macronutrients [Data Analysis]

Analysis of the USDA Cost of Food at Home database shows that fat is the cheapest macronutrient. Protein is the most expensive macronutrient, however a reduced carbohydrate diet does not necessarily require an increase in protein. Reducing the amount of carbohydrate and increasing the amount of fat in your diet is the most effective way […]

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Food insulin index v2

It’s generally difficult for healthy people to eat too much protein.  However the fact that protein requires some insulin to metabolise is an important consideration for people who need to inject extra to keep their blood glucose levels stable. A better understanding of the insulin response to various foods would be useful for diabetics calculating their […]

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Blood glucose, glucagon and insulin response to protein

The food insulin index data indicates that there is both a blood sugar and an insulin response to the glucogenic component of protein. [1] A higher protein intake tends to lead to better blood sugar control, increased satiety and reduced caloric intake. Digested amino acids from protein circulate in the bloodstream until they are required for […]

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