fine tuning your diet to suit your goals – Chris Kelly


I’m a big fan of Chris Kelly’s Nourish Balance Thrive podcast[1]

It’s sort of like listening to Jimmy Moore, Dave Asprey and Ben Greenfield all rolled into one, but even nerdier and more intellectually challenging.

I first heard the term “glucogenic protein” on one of Chris’s podcasts [2] and went searching  to learn more and the epic Insulin Index V2 article was the result.

I also have really enjoyed Chris’ discussion about heart rate variability (HRV), gut health and a range of other intriguing subjects. [3]

Chris is a software engineer who used to work for a hedge fund and has now chosen to go into full time nutritional therapy counselling with a bit of pro-mountain biking on the side!  He’s also into kettlebells.

He has basically mastered all my passions and hobbies and taken them to the elite level!  I’m not that jealous, really.

Chris is another endurance athlete who found he had pre-diabetic blood sugars (like Tim Noakes, Ben Greenfield and Sami Inkenen), and has turned to the ketogenic diet to normalise his blood sugars.

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Chris’s diet

Chris posted his daily food dairy outputs from cron-o-metre [4] on Facebook recently and gave me permission to run the numbers on it to see what we could learn.

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Using cron-o-metre is superior to MyFitnessPal because it tracks your micronutrients in addition to calories and macronutrients.

As shown in nutritional analysis below, Chris’s nutrient dense diet has achieved the RDI for all of the key micronutrients.   His protein intake is solid but not high at about 1.5g/kg LBM.

Chris uses MCT oil to fuel his cycling with some slow release Superstarch to top off his glycogen stores for races without throwing him out of ketosis.

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The plot of Chris’s macronutrients from his daily food diary shows that his diet is certainly ketogenic.  When he occasionally measures his blood ketones they’re pretty high at around 2.1mmol/L. [5]

At the same time he gets a really solid 46g of fibre per day (compared to the RDI of 30g for men), with a low 5% net carbs and a very low 16% insulinogenic calories.  One of the issues I see for a lot of people trying to reduce their carbohydrates is that they struggle to get enough fibre for digestion and good gut health.

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nutritional analysis

But can a diet that is so highly ketogenic also provide adequate nutrition?   I ran his daily food diary though nutrientdata.self.com and the results are solid.

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The nutritional content would depend heavily on the source of his beef ground  beef  which makes up most of his protein on the day I have analysed.  I know Chris also goes out of his way to eat organ meats, and the locally sourced grain feed beef that he gets would likely have a higher protein quality score than the ground beef profile in the USDA database.

It should also be noted that the data from his daily food diary entered into nutritiondata.self.com hasn’t captured everything given, because it didn’t seem to have yerba mate tea, kim chi and bone broth which would have a bunch more nutrients.

increasing the protein score

The table below shows how Chris’s food diary stacks up against the 200 or so other meals and daily diaries that I have analysed.  I have used the diabetic / nutritional ketosis weighting in the ranking which prioritises a low insulin load with solid vitamins, minerals and protein.

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The only area where the “base” food diary is lacking compared to the other meals is the protein score.  The score of 0.01 for protein means that it is about average for the 200 meals analysed.

The calorie density score is low, however this is not a problem given that Chris is already quite lean (as you can see from the photo above).

Chris uses MCT oil to fuel his cycling, and weight loss is not a goal.  Trying to get him to reduce the calorie density of his diet with more broccoli and mushrooms would mean that he just couldn’t physically get in enough fuel!

You can see from the comparison of the nutrients and amino acids from various protein sources below that muscle meat is not necessarily the most nutrient dense source of protein.

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If we replace the ground beef with sardines which have a higher quality of amino acids we get the updated nutritional profile shown below.  Both the protein score and the vitamin score has increased with the sardines.

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So overall, Chris’s diet is currently well suited to his goals; however, refining the quality of the protein source could further improve the vitamin and mineral content of his diet.

Overall, I think Chris’s diet is a great example of how someone can get great nutrition and high amounts of fibre while still achieving ketosis.

references

[1] http://www.nourishbalancethrive.com/podcasts

[2] http://www.nourishbalancethrive.com/blog/2014/12/29/protein-transcription/

[3] http://www.nourishbalancethrive.com/blog/2014/12/16/how-track-hrv-measure-progress/

[4] https://cronometer.com/

[5] https://www.facebook.com/groups/optimisingnutrition/permalink/1462501844050859/

One thought on “fine tuning your diet to suit your goals – Chris Kelly”

  1. Getting enough fiber–isn’t this where coconut flour, flax/chia meal, psyllium/glucomannan, and cocoa powder can play a role? Coconut flour is purported to be up to 55% fiber, while psyllium and/or glucomannan is 100% fiber.

    Miracle Noodles help on the glucomannan front with assorted shapes of “pasta” and “rice” for those who cannot tolerate psyllium (which some say is a grain). Powdered glucomannan is also available for sale, and is used 1/4 t. at a time in recipes to thicken–makes great gravy, pudding, and thick smoothies, and the stuff lasts forever (which is good, because it may take you that long to use it up!).

    Getting enough fiber is easy, but it’s difficult to do on just vegetation alone. The ingredients listed above are all used in keto baking, so GET BAKING!

    Liked by 1 person

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