chia seed pudding

Our good friend Tash Kimlin made these chia puddings when she came around for lunch and they have become a regular low carb staple for us.

The good thing about chia seeds for people with diabetes is that the carbs in them are 80% fibre, so the insulin requirement drops right down. Chia seeds are also a great source of omega 3 fatty acids.

Even with a small amount of mango and raspberries for taste and additional vitamins there is less than 10g of net carbs and overall it has only 14% insulinogenic calories.

The basic ingredients are straight forward and include:

  • 300ml coconut cream
  • 100ml water
  • ¼ cup chia seeds
  • 2 tbs stevia (or sweetener of choice)

To prepare you will mix ingredients together, refrigerate until it sets and add fruit or whatever topping you chose.

There are a range of permutations of this recipe online with further preparation details such as this one or this one.

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net carbs

insulin load carb insulin fat protein

fibre

10g 14g 73% 68% 7%

15g

You can reduce the carb load by leaving out the fruit if you wanted to bring down the insulin load further, however the change is only marginal.

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net carbs insulin load carb insulin fat protein fibre
7g 11g 68% 67% 8% 13g

If you are trying to achieve tight blood sugar control I suggest you test before and after having this as some people find that their blood sugars rise with coconut cream.  The fibre in the chia may react in some people in different ways and may become more digestible if they are soaked for longer.

8 thoughts on “chia seed pudding”

    1. Flax also has great omega 3 content but wouldn’t have the same texture to create a pudding. Flax seed (whole) does not break down in the gut but passes straight through, with the sharp ends possibly damaging the gut

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  1. Sounds good, thank you!

    I know everyone raves about chia as a superfood, but are they so much better than (milled) flaxseed/linseed, hemp seed, etc. considering the extra cost? (The cost is almost double in the UK, but I don’t know about USA or elsewhere.)

    I’d be very interested if you’d post more on this topic at some point.

    Thanks and keep up the good work!

    Like

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